Beef Washington: The American Beef Wellington

Take some snooty old beef wellington, hit it with 2204.62 pounds of freedom, you got Beef Washington.

Robort

The Scrambled Musings Of Robort, the Robot Dog

Robort doesn’t always know what he’s talking about, but he sure does have a lot to say about food. If you’re not also a robot, dog, or robot dog, it’s best to just ignore what he says and skip to the recipe

The Story Behind American Beef Wellington – The Original Dish for Royalty

Born in the battlefields of the Revolutionary War and raised in the prairies of a new nation, Beef Washington is a beef like no other. Forget about some self-important bovine aristocrat in the UK; Beef Washington is where it’s at. We cook it the American way with 2204.62 pounds of freedom!

The story begins with the protagonist, a Chef and former soldier who is working for a food truck in NYC. He yearns to create Culinary Art that is as renowned as his hero, Escoffier. He wanders the streets of NYC in frustration until he finally finds his art: American Beef Wellington.

The protagonist is now a famous chef! The protagonist is cooking a Beef Wellington for a renowned client, when an argument with her assistant over how to make it ensues. The protagonist, who is new to the cooking field, has no idea about the dish he is cooking for this prominent guest who is about to arrive. So, he does what any other confident chef would do: rushes through and finishes the dish in a very amateurish way. And this is how Beef Washington – or at least its original incarnation – was born; when The Simpsons stopped being funny.

Freedom Tastes Like Beef (a song)

[Intro]

Freedom tastes like beef

It’s not just a metaphor

You know what it’s like to get a taste of freedom

[Hook]

Freedom tastes like beef

You know when the song comes on and everybody in the crowd is singing along?

[Verse]

When you have nothing left to prove, that’s when you get up to leave

You see folks on TV and they’re telling you that there’s something wrong with you

But if you’re happy in your own skin, then I think you’re doing alright

Cause freedom tastes like beef, it’s not just a metaphor

You know what it’s like to get a taste of freedom

[Chorus]

It tastes so good, the taste of freedom is sweeter than plantains

It feels so good, knowing I’m finally free from those chains

And I know I can make it, I know I can make it through this world

Cause Freedom Tastes Like Beef

The American Beef Wellington: A History of Classic American Cuisine

What is the beef washington?

The beef Washington is a dish which consists of tenderloin of beef, wrapped in bacon, and smothered in a layer of onion gravy.

The origin of the dish is not clear. It has been speculated that it was created by French chef Marie-Antoine Carême for George IV’s 1816 coronation banquet or that it was created by British chef Charles Elmé Francatelli for Queen Victoria’s coronation banquet in 1838.

Beef Washington is a dish that originated in England. Someone threw it into the sea and it floated to America. It was originally made with venison, but now it is usually made with beef. The dish is similar to beef tenderloin wrapped in puff pastry.

The Beef Wellington in America and a Brief History of The Dish’s Introduction to the Species

The Beef Wellington is a dish that has been around for centuries, originating from medieval Europe. It was introduced to the Americans in the 1800s and has since become a staple of American cuisine.

The dish is made by wrapping beef tenderloin in puff pastry and then cooking it in a sauce of red wine, onions, mushrooms, and various herbs. The dish is usually served with mashed potatoes or rice.

What a Beef Washington Tastes Like – A Review of What to Expect When Eating a Beef Washington (a song)

Ooh, beef Washington

What a Beef Washington tastes like

Oh, beef Washington

it’s absolutely divine

To have you right in front of me

I’m in love with beef Washington, ooh

It’s so satisfying

A beef Washington is just so fine

I love thee so much

I want to eat you every day and all day long

A Brief History of Beef Wellington: The Dish That’s Been Around for Centuries

Beef Wellington is a dish that has been around for centuries.

The history of beef wellington begins with the French dish boeuf en croûte. This dish was created by chef Marie-Antoine Carême, who was one of the most famous chefs in France during his time. His recipe for beef en croûte was created as a way to make use of leftover beef from roasts and other dishes. He wrapped the beef in puff pastry and then baked it to create this new dish.

Carême’s creation later became popular all over Europe and eventually made its way to England where it was renamed “Beef Wellington” after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Beef

Beef Washington

Born in the battlefields of the Revolutionary War and raised in the prairies of a new nation, Beef Washington is a beef like no other. Forget about some self-important bovine aristocrat in the UK; Beef Washington is where it's at. We cook it the American way with 2204.62 pounds of freedom!
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: American
Servings: 4 serving
Calories: 570kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 / 4 lb ground beef regular
  • 1/2 onion large , diced
  • 2 pickle large , sliced
  • 2 tbsps garlic crushed
  • 1 tbsp worcestershire sauce
  • 150 g pizza dough ball
  • salt
  • pepper
  • ketchup
  • mustard
  • flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tbsp milk
  • 5.3 oz cheddar cheese sharp , shredded

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 425F
  • Add the beef to a large pan, season with salt and pepper and brown on medium 5-8 minutes.
  • Once almost browned, mix in the garlic and Worcestershire sauce. Continue to cook until beef is fully browned- another 3-5 minutes or so.
  • On a lightly floured surface roll out the pizza dough into a long oval about 12 inches long, 5 inches wide and 1/4 inch thick.
  • Drain fat from the ground beef then spread evenly over the dough.
  • Evenly sprinkle the cheese over the meat then top with the onions and pickles.
  • Tightly roll everything into a long meat log of freedom and place on a greased baking sheet.
  • Whisk together the egg and milk and brush the log with the egg wash. Bake for 20 minutes at 425F
  • Cut thick slices from the log and serve with ketchup and mustard.

Nutrition

Calories: 570kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 33g | Fat: 38g | Saturated Fat: 17g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 13g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 159mg | Sodium: 929mg | Potassium: 462mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 505IU | Vitamin C: 4mg | Calcium: 329mg | Iron: 4mg